Conversations LIVE

Scroll down for full details about upcoming Conversations LIVE broadcasts. In this special feature of TWR LIVE, Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche speaks live on Facebook with experts in many fields including science, health, philosophy, medicine and spirituality. Presenters share from their specialties their perspectives on relevant issues of our time, and Rinpoche weaves in pertinent aspects related to the ancient Tibetan Bön Buddhist teachings. Opportunities are available to engage in question-answer sessions with Rinpoche and presenters. More about TWR LIVE
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About Geshe Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche.
Rinpoche is an acclaimed author and a respected teacher of students worldwide. As the founder and spiritual director of Ligmincha International, he has established numerous centers and institutes of learning in the United States, Mexico, South America, Europe and India. Fluent in English, Rinpoche regularly offers online teachings in the form of live webcasts, online workshops and YouTube videos. He is renowned for his depth of wisdom; his clear, engaging teaching style; and his dedication to making the ancient Tibetan teachings highly accessible and relevant to the lives of Westerners.


Tuesday, March 21, 2017, 12:00 noon Eastern Time U.S.—(New York time):

A conversation with Kristin Neff, associate professor of educational psychology at the University of Texas at Austin.

The Science of Compassion: How research underlines the value of cultivating compassion for oneself and others.  View recording

Having compassion toward your own failings and imperfections leads to greater well-being than repeated self-judgment, research indicates. As one of the world’s leading experts on the psychological health benefits of self-compassion, Kristin Neff, Ph.D., has studied compassion for more than 10 years. She has developed a scale used by researchers worldwide that measures the construct of self-compassion according to three components: self-kindness, common humanity, and mindfulness. Drawing from ancient wisdom teachings, Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche will discuss with Dr. Neff the implications of her pioneering research, which demonstrates that self-compassion leads to healthier lifestyle habits, lowers anxiety and depression, enhances motivation, supports more satisfying relationships, and is linked to enhanced immune function. Cultivating compassion first for oneself and then for others can extend the benefits even further, to society at large.

Kristin NeffKristin Neff is currently an associate professor of educational psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. She conducted the first empirical studies on self-compassion more than a decade ago. In addition to writing numerous academic articles and book chapters on the topic, she is author of Self-Compassion: The Proven Power of Being Kind to Yourself (William Morrow, 2015) and the 6 CD audio set Self-Compassion Step by Step (Sounds True, 2013). With her colleague Chris Germer she developed an empirically supported eight-week training program called Mindful Self-Compassion, and offers workshops on self-compassion worldwide. Kristin is also featured in the bestselling book and award-winning documentary The Horse Boy, which chronicles her family’s journey to Mongolia where they trekked on horseback to find healing for her autistic son. Learn more about Kristin Neff here


Saturday, March 25, 2017, 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time U.S.—(New York time):

A conversation with Berkeley professor David E. Presti, neurobiologist, psychologist, and cognitive scientist.

The Science of Meditating While Asleep: Lucid dreaming and conscious sleeping from the perspectives of modern science and direct meditative experience. 

Berkeley professor David E. Presti, Ph.D., discusses the contemporary study of sleep and consciousness, drawing from central concepts of Western neuroscience, evolutionary biology, chemistry, and physics. He explains how brain physiology and the structure and function of our nervous system relate to notions of mind, self, and consciousness, including lucidity during dream and sleep. Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche elaborates on how these concepts agree with Buddhist philosophy and meditation theory, based on centuries of self-observation by great Tibetan meditation masters.

David Presti_0 David E. Presti is a neurobiologist, psychologist, and cognitive scientist at the University of California, Berkeley, where he has taught since 1991. From 1990 to 2000 he worked as a clinical psychologist in the treatment of addiction and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center in San Francisco. Dr. Presti received his doctorate in molecular biology and biophysics from the California Institute of Technology and in clinical psychology from the University of Oregon. For 10 years (1999-2010) he served as a core faculty member in the California School of Professional Psychology (Alliant University) graduate program in psychopharmacology, providing training to clinical psychologists interested in prescribing psychotropic medications. Since 2004 he has been teaching neuroscience to Tibetan monks and nuns in India and, more recently, in Bhutan as part of a dialogue between science and religion initiated by His Holiness the Dalai Lama. His areas of expertise include human neurobiology and neurochemistry, the effects of drugs on the brain and the mind, the treatment of addiction, and the scientific study of the mind and consciousness. Learn more about Dr. Presti here


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